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Patterns Of Work In The Post-Fordist Era

Patterns Of Work In The Post-Fordist Era

Fordism and Post-Fordism

Huw Beynon , Theo Nichols

Edited by Huw Beynon, Director, School of Social Sciences and Theo Nichols, Distinguished Research Professor, School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University, UK

Two volume set 2006 1,176 pp Hardback 978 1 84542 324 7

Hardback £330.00 on-line price £297.00

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Series: Elgar Mini Series






Description
‘The world of work has changed dramatically over the past 50 – or even 30 – years, and it is fashionable to speak of a transformation from Fordism to Post-Fordism. But what exactly is new, and what remains the same? With their comprehensive selection of readings and their own sensitive overview of the issues, Huw Beynon and Theo Nichols provide the foundation for a nuanced answer – and show that the brave new world of work is no utopia.’
– Richard Hyman, London School of Economics, UK

Although the activities of large industrial and financial corporations dominate economies around the world, their impact on the distribution of employment and the use of new production techniques is much disputed. In this two-volume set, the editors examine the changes which have taken place in the organization of work and the nature of employment over the last half century.

Contents
55 articles, dating from 1986 to 2004 Contributors include: M. Burawoy, C. Crouch, S. Frenkel, C. Lever-Tracy, D. Massey, J. Peck, G. Ritzer, P. Thompson, N. Thrift, C. Tilly

Further information

‘The world of work has changed dramatically over the past 50 – or even 30 – years, and it is fashionable to speak of a transformation from Fordism to Post-Fordism. But what exactly is new, and what remains the same? With their comprehensive selection of readings and their own sensitive overview of the issues, Huw Beynon and Theo Nichols provide the foundation for a nuanced answer – and show that the brave new world of work is no utopia.’
– Richard Hyman, London School of Economics, UK

Although the activities of large industrial and financial corporations dominate economies around the world, their impact on the distribution of employment and the use of new production techniques is much disputed. In this two-volume set, the editors examine the changes which have taken place in the organization of work and the nature of employment over the last half century.

The articles selected for these volumes address the issues of work, skills and employment, with particular focus on the manufacturing sector, which has seen rapid change in working practices, and on the expanding service sector, where new kinds of jobs entail serving customers and working in the money, banking and financial services, call-centres and the public and government sector. Many of the studies challenge the utopian view of post-Fordist work regimes and raise questions about the effectiveness of post-Fordist concepts in accounting for the variety of changes in the world economy.

In a new introduction the editors offer a comprehensive overview and discussion of these concerns.

Full table of contents

Contents:
Volume I:
Acknowledgements
Introduction Huw Beynon and Theo Nichols
PART I FORDISM/POST-FORDISM? WHAT IS THE QUESTION?
1. Ray Kiely (1998), ‘Globalization, Post-Fordism and the Contemporary Context of Development’
2. Kuniko Fujita and Richard Child Hill (1995), ‘Global Toyotaism and Local Development’
3. George Ritzer (1989), ‘The Permanently New Economy: The Case for Reviving Economic Sociology’
4. Randy Hodson (1995), ‘Worker Resistance: An Underdeveloped Concept in the Sociology of Work’
5. Paul Thompson and Stephen Ackroyd (1995), ‘All Quiet on the Workplace Front? A Critique of Recent Trends in British Industrial Sociology’
6. Ethan B. Kapstein (1996), ‘Workers and the World Economy’
7. Charles Tilly (1995), ‘Globalization Threatens Labor’s Rights’
PART II WORK, SKILLS AND EMPLOYMENT: THE JOBS ISSUE
8. John Atkinson and Denis Gregory (1986), ‘A Flexible Future: Britain’s Dual Labour Force’
9. Doreen Massey (1983), ‘The Shape of Things to Come’
10. Peter Cappelli (1995), ‘Rethinking Employment’
11. John Francis Geary (1992), ‘Employment Flexibility and Human Resource Management: The Case of Three American Electronics Plants’
12. Colin Crouch (1997), ‘Skills-based Full Employment: The Latest Philosopher’s Stone’
13. Duncan Gallie (1991), ‘Patterns of Skill Change: Upskilling, Deskilling or the Polarization of Skills?’
14. Damian Grimshaw, Huw Beynon, Jill Rubery and Kevin Ward (2002), ‘The Restructuring of Career Paths in Large Service Sector Organizations: “Delayering”’
15. Jamie Peck and Nikolas Theodore (2000), ‘“Beyond ‘Employability”’
PART III MANUFACTURING JOBS: MOTORS – OLD JOBS, NEW CONTEXTS
16. Alan McKinlay and Ken Starkey (1994), ‘After Henry: Continuity and Change in Ford Motor Company’
17. John Holloway (1987), ‘The Red Rose of Nissan’
18. Stephen Wood (1987), ‘On the Line’
19. Jonas Pontusson (1992), ‘Unions, New Technology, and Job Redesign at Volvo and British Leyland’
20. Ruy de Quadros Carvalho and Hubert Schmitz (1989), ‘Fordism is Alive in Brazil’
21. Constance Lever-Tracy (1990), ‘Fordism Transformed? Employee Involvement and Workplace Industrial Relations at Ford’
22. Alice R. de P. Abreu, Huw Beynon and José Ricardo Ramalho (2000), ‘“The Dream Factory”: VW’s Modular Production System in Resende, Brazil’
23. Jorge Carrillo V. (1995), ‘Flexible Production in the Auto Sector: Industrial Reorganization at Ford-Mexico’
Name Index

Volume II
Acknowledgements
An introduction by the editors to both volumes appears in Volume I
PART I BEYOND MOTORS – MANUFACTURING CHANGE
1. Rik Huys, Luc Sels, Geert Van Hootegem, Jan Bundervoet and Erik Hendrickx (1999), ‘Toward Less Division of Labor? New Production Concepts in the Automotive, Chemical, Clothing, and Machine Tool Industries’
2. Ian M. Taplin (1995), ‘Flexible Production, Rigid Jobs: Lessons from the Clothing Industry’
3. Alastair Whyte Greig (1992), ‘Rhetoric and Reality in the Clothing Industry: The Case of Post-Fordism’
4. Chul-Kyoo Kim and James Curry (1993), ‘Fordism, Flexible Specialization and Agri-Industrial Restructuring: The Case of the US Broiler Industry’
5. Joel Novek (1989), ‘Peripheralizing Core Labour Markets?: The Case of the Canadian Meat Packing Industry’
6. Jody Knauss (1998), ‘Modular Mass Production: High Performance on the Low Road’
7. Chris Rowley (1998), ‘Manufacturing Mobility? Internationalization, Change and Continuity’
PART II NEW KINDS OF JOBS: CALL CENTRES
8. Sue Fernie (1998), ‘Hanging on the Telephone’
9. Stephen J. Frenkel, May Tam, Marek Korczynski and Karen Shire (1998), ‘Beyond Bureaucracy? Work Organization in Call Centres’
10. Gavin Poynter (2000), ‘“Thank You for Calling”: The New Ideology of Work in the Service Economy’
11. David Holman and Sue Fernie (2000), ‘Can I Help You? Call Centres and Job Satisfaction’
12. Phil Taylor, Chris Baldry, Peter Bain and Vaughan Ellis (2003), ‘“A Unique Working Environment”: Health, Sickness and Absence Management in UK Call Centres’
PART III JOBS IN FINANCIAL SERVICES
13. John Storey, Peter Cressey, Tim Morris and Adrian Wilkinson (1997), ‘Changing Employment Practices in UK Banking: Case Studies’
14. Andrew Leyshon and Nigel Thrift (1993), ‘The Restructuring of the U.K. Financial Services Industry in the 1990s: A Reversal of Fortune?’
15. D.J. Pratt (1998), ‘Re-placing Money: The Evolution of Branch Banking in Britain’
16. Adam Tickell (1997), ‘Restructuring the British Financial Sector into the Twenty-first Century’
17. Terry Austrin (1991), ‘Flexibility, Surveillance and Hype in New Zealand Financial Retailing’
PART IV SERVING THE CUSTOMER
18. Holly J. McCammon and Larry J. Griffin (2000), ‘Workers and Their Customers and Clients’
19. Paul du Gay (1993), ‘“Numbers and Souls”: Retailing and De-Differentiation of Economy and Culture’
20. Patrice Rosenthal, Stephen Hill and Riccardo Peccei (1997), ‘Checking Out Service: Evaluating Excellence, HRM and TQM in Retailing’
21. Yvonne Guerrier and Amel S. Adib (2000), ‘“No, We Don’t Provide That Service”: The Harassment of Hotel Employees by Customers’
22. Linda Fuller and Vicki Smith (1991), ‘Consumers’ Reports: Management by Customers in a Changing Economy’
PART V WORKING FOR THE STATE
23. Bob Carter (1997), ‘Restructuring State Employment: Labour and Non-Labour in the Capitalist State’
24. Deborah Foster and Paul Hoggett (1999), ‘Change in the Benefits Agency: Empowering the Exhausted Worker?’
25. Geraldine Lee-Treweek (1997), ‘Women, Resistance and Care: An Ethnographic Study of Nursing Auxiliary Work’
26. Donna Baines (2004), ‘Caring for Nothing: Work Organization and Unwaged Labour in Social Services’
27. Stephen Harrison and George Dowswell (2002), ‘Autonomy and Bureaucratic Accountability in Primary Care: What English General Practitioners Say’
28. Tim May (1994), ‘Transformative Power: A Study in a Human Service Organization’
29. Chris Jones (2001), ‘Voices From the Front Line: State Social Workers and New Labour’
PART VI BEYOND THE STATE: THE FUTURE OF WORK?
30. Theo Nichols and Julia O’Connell Davidson (1993), ‘Privatisation and Economism: An Investigation amongst “Producers” in Two Privatised Public Utilities in Britain’
31. Michael Burawoy and Pavel Krotov (1992), ‘The Soviet Transition from Socialism to Capitalism: Worker Control and Economic Bargaining in the Wood Industry’
32. Helen Sampson (2003), ‘Transnational Drifters or Hyperspace Dwellers: An Exploration of the Lives of Filipino Seafarers Aboard and Ashore’
Name Index




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