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The Political Economy Of Genetically Modified Foods

The Political Economy Of Genetically Modified Foods

Robert E. Evenson , Terri Raney

Edited by Robert E. Evenson, former Professor of Economics, Yale University, US and Terri Raney, Senior Economist and Editor, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

2007 512 pp Hardback 978 1 84376 762 6

Hardback £142.00 on-line price £127.80

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Series: Elgar Mini Series






Description
‘This excellent collection of readings on this complex and highly political topic covers all the key issues. How those issues are resolved in the years ahead will have a profound effect on the world food economy and especially on the hungry and malnourished.’
– Kym Anderson, The World Bank, US

This important collection prepared by Robert E. Evenson and Terri Raney – leading scholars in the field – focuses on one of the most controversial issues of our time – the genetic modification of agricultural produce. Whilst the US and Canada are supportive of GM crops, the European Union urges other countries to involve the ‘precautionary principle’ in regulatory policy. This comprehensive volume, which will appeal to scholars and practitioners alike, includes papers discussing this European Union–North American divide and possible resolutions of differences on this subject. Topics examined include: the technology; the industry; farmer adoption; consumer acceptance; economic impacts; the emergence of GM free markets and GM products for developing countries.

Contents
30 articles, dating from 2000 to 2005 Contributors include: D. Gollin, W. Huffman, T. Josling, N. Kalaitzandonakis, R. Paarlbert, P. Pingali, C. Pray, T. Raney, V. Ruttan

Further information

‘. . . the book covers socio-economic and policy aspects related to GM crops in a very comprehensive way. Most of the individual papers are of high quality and provide interesting results.’
– Matin Qaim, Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture

‘This volume will be of particular importance to scholars and practitioners alike.’
– CAB Abstracts

‘This volume does an excellent job encapsulating the recent thinking on transgenic crops. This collection of well-written papers presents the debate on the future of biotechnology within the context of the evolution of agriculture, economic development, the environment, and international trade. The book conveys the vast potential of agricultural biotechnology in enhancing human well-being and environmental quality, and the challenges that lie ahead in developing policies that will tap this potential. It is an important read for those interested in technological change, agriculture, development, and the environment.’
– David Zilberman, University of California, Berkeley, US

‘This excellent collection of readings on this complex and highly political topic covers all the key issues. How those issues are resolved in the years ahead will have a profound effect on the world food economy and especially on the hungry and malnourished.’
– Kym Anderson, The World Bank, US

This important collection prepared by Robert E. Evenson and Terri Raney – leading scholars in the field – focuses on one of the most controversial issues of our time – the genetic modification of agricultural produce. Whilst the US and Canada are supportive of GM crops, the European Union urges other countries to involve the ‘precautionary principle’ in regulatory policy. This comprehensive volume, which will appeal to scholars and practitioners alike, includes papers discussing this European Union–North American divide and possible resolutions of differences on this subject. Topics examined include: the technology; the industry; farmer adoption; consumer acceptance; economic impacts; the emergence of GM free markets and GM products for developing countries.

Full table of contents

Contents:

Acknowledgements

Introduction Robert E. Evenson and Terri Raney

PART I OVERVIEW
1. (2004), ‘FAO Declares War on Farmers Not on Hunger’
2. Jaques Diouf (2004), ‘Biotechnology: FAO Response to Open Letter from NGOs’
3. International Consortium on Agricultural Biotechnology Research (ICABR), Open Letter to FAO Director General in Support of SOFA 2003-04 Biotechnology Report
4. Robert L. Paarlberg, Raymond F. Hopkins and Lisa Ladewski (2004), ‘Regulation of GM Crops: Shaping an International Regime’

PART II THE TECHNOLOGY
5. Vernon W. Ruttan (2000), ‘The Biotechnology Industries’
6. Christian Jung (2000), ‘Molecular Tools for Plant Breeding’
7. Kate Dreher, Michael Morris, Mireille Khairallah, Jean Marcel Ribaut, Shivaji Pandey and Ganesan Srinivasan (2002), ‘Is Marker-Assisted Selection Cost-Effective Compared with Conventional Plant Breeding Methods? The Case of Quality Protein Maize’

PART III THE INDUSTRY
8. Robert E. Evenson (2002), ‘Agricultural Biotechnology’
9. Carl E. Pray and Anwar Naseem (2003), ‘The Economics of Agricultural Biotechnology Research’

PART IV FARMER ADOPTION
10. Food and Agriculture Organization (2004), ‘From the Green Revolution to the Gene Revolution’

PART V CONSUMER ACCEPTANCE
11. Joe L. Parcell and Nicholas G. Kalaitzandonakes (2004), ‘Do Agricultural Commodity Prices Respond to GMO Bans?’
12. Wallace E. Huffman, Matthew Rousu, Jason F. Shogren and Abebayehu Tegene (2004), ‘The Welfare Effects of Implementing Mandatory GM Labelling in the USA’
13. Marianne McGarry-Wolf, Paola Bertolini and Jacob Parker-Garcia (2004), ‘A Comparison of Consumer Attitudes Towards GM Food in Italy and the USA’
14. Sylvie Bonny (2004), ‘Factors Explaining Opposition to GMOs in France and the Rest of Europe’

PART VI HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS
15. Food and Agriculture Organization (2004), ‘Health and Environmental Impacts of Transgenic Crops’

PART VII THE EVOLVING REGULATORY STRUCTURE
16. Lydia Zepeda (2004), ‘Genetically Engineered Food Labelling: Global Policy Polarization’
17. Jill E. Hobbs, William A. Kerr, J.D. Gaisford, Grant Issac and Kurt K. Klein (2004), ‘Conflict and Consensus-Building: International Commercial Policy and Agricultural Biotechnology’
18. Dirk Heumueller and Tim Josling (2004), ‘Trade Restrictions on Genetically Engineered Foods: The Application of the TBT Agreement’

PART VIII THE EMERGENCE OF GM FREE MARKETS
19. Michael Burton, Sallie James, Bob Lindner and Jo Pluske (2002), ‘A Way Forward for Frankenstein Foods’
20. Troy G. Schmitz, Charles B. Moss and Andrew Schmitz (2004), ‘Segmentation of GMO and Non-GMO Soybean Markets Under Identity Preservation Costs and Government Price Supports’
21. Tirtha Dhar and Jeremy D. Foltz (2005), ‘Milk by Any Other Name… Consumer Benefits from Labeled Milk’

PART IX ECONOMIC IMPACTS
22. Food and Agriculture Organization (2004), ‘Economic Impacts of Transgenic Crops’
23. Lovell S. Jarvis (2002), ‘The Potential Effect of Recombinant Bovine Somatotropin on World Dairying’
24. Stuart Smyth and Peter W.B. Phillips (2002), ‘Science and Regulation: Assessing the Impacts of Incomplete Institutions and Information in the Global Agricultural Biotechnology Industry’
25. Monika Tothova and James F. Oehmke (2006), ‘Biotechnology and the Emergence of Club Behaviour in Agricultural Trade’
26. Kym Anderson, Chantal Pohl Nielsen and Sherman Robinson (2002), ‘Estimating the Economic Effects of GMOs: The Importance of Policy Choices and Preferences’

PART X GM PRODUCTS FOR DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
27. Robert E. Evenson (2004), ‘GMOs: Prospects for Productivity Increases in Developing Countries’
28. Food and Agriculture Organization (2004), ‘Research And Research Policy For the Poor’
29. Food and Agriculture Organization (2004), ‘Capacity Building For Biotechnology In Food And Agriculture’

Name Index



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