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Modelling Income Distribution

Modelling Income Distribution

John Creedy

John Creedy, The Truby Williams Professor of Economics, University of Melbourne, Australia

2002 288 pp Hardback 978 1 84376 009 2

Hardback £83.00 on-line price £74.70

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Description
‘This book collects a number of recent papers, produced during the later 1990s and early 2000s, concerned with modelling income distribution and redistribution. Part I is concerned with modelling the functional form of the income distribution using the generalised exponential family of distributions. Part II deals with the influence of personal income distribution of macroeconomic variables and Part III is concerned with several aspects of income redistribution modelling.’
– From the preface by John Creedy

This book collects recent research on modelling income distribution and redistribution by John Creedy and a number of other eminent co-authors. The book opens with the main results of a research programme, largely with Vance Martin, on distributional modelling using the generalised exponential family. The authors argue that the major advantages of this family are its flexibility, particularly in handling multimodality, and the explicit link with structural demand and supply models.

The book goes on to discuss the research, undertaken with Alex Bakker, on the effects of macroeconomic variables, particularly unemployment and inflation, on the personal distribution. The use of the generalised exponential family in this context is explored, as well as the use of mixture distributions.

Contents
Contents: Preface Part I: Generalised Exponential Distributions Part II: Macro-variables and Income Distribution Part III: Income Redistribution Index

Further information

This book collects recent research on modelling income distribution and redistribution by John Creedy and a number of other eminent co-authors. The book opens with the main results of a research programme, largely with Vance Martin, on distributional modelling using the generalised exponential family. The authors argue that the major advantages of this family are its flexibility, particularly in handling multimodality, and the explicit link with structural demand and supply models.

The book goes on to discuss the research, undertaken with Alex Bakker, on the effects of macroeconomic variables, particularly unemployment and inflation, on the personal distribution. The use of the generalised exponential family in this context is explored, as well as the use of mixture distributions.

Finally, income redistribution is examined in depth. This includes work, mainly with Justin van de Ven, on decomposing the redistributive effects of taxes into vertical, horizontal and reranking effects. The final chapters, with Duangkamon Chotikapanich, explore the Bayesian estimation of a range of social welfare, inequality and tax progressivity measures. Posterior distributions of the measures are obtained.

Modelling Income Distribution should be of interest to a wide range of academics and researchers with an interest in welfare economics and econometric theory.



 
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