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Recent Developments In Labor Economics

Recent Developments In Labor Economics

John T. Addison

Edited by John T. Addison, Hugh C. Lane Professor of Economic Theory, University of South Carolina, Columbia, US and Professor of Economics, Queen’s University, Belfast, UK

Three volume set 2007 1,912 pp Hardback 978 1 84064 925 3

Hardback £536.00 on-line price £482.40

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Series: The International Library of Critical Writings in Economics series






Description
‘In this 3 volume collection of papers John Addison covers 13 topics and includes 70 papers published between 1984 and 2006. These papers, almost all of which are empirically based, are designed to give a flavour of the increasingly sophisticated techniques that have been used to tease out the underlying relationships in areas ranging from labour demand to personnel economics. Labour economists will find it most helpful to have so many outstanding recent papers readily available in these three volumes.’
– P.J. Sloane, University of Wales Swansea, UK

Contents
70 articles, dating from 1984 to 2006 Contributors include: O. Ashenfelter, O. Blanchard, M. Browning, D. Card, A.R. Cardoso, J. Chilton, C. Olson, D. Parent, P. Portugal, P. Rota

Further information

‘This collection of papers offers new perspectives on the classic topics of labor economics, drawing on analyses of labor markets around the world. The papers use ingenious methods to capture how the interplay between market forces and institutions determines labor market outcomes. As a compendium of recent “must read” research contributions, this volume belongs in the library of all labor economists.’
– Robert J. Flanagan, Stanford University, US

‘A fine collection of modern classics which have shaped and altered our thinking about labor economics. Even in times of internet access to many journals, these are three volumes that deserve to be placed on your book shelves as standard references.’
– Claus Schnabel, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany

‘In this 3 volume collection of papers John Addison covers 13 topics and includes 70 papers published between 1984 and 2006. These papers, almost all of which are empirically based, are designed to give a flavour of the increasingly sophisticated techniques that have been used to tease out the underlying relationships in areas ranging from labour demand to personnel economics. Labour economists will find it most helpful to have so many outstanding recent papers readily available in these three volumes.’
– P.J. Sloane, University of Wales Swansea, UK

This comprehensive set of papers charts the main developments in contemporary labour economics, with an emphasis on issues of measurement. Topics covered in the first volume include the effects of adjustment costs on employment and the modeling of family choice in labor supply. Key themes explored in the second volume include the role of unobserved worker characteristics in obscuring the tradeoff between wages and benefits, payment systems in circumstances where results are verifiable and nonverifiable, formal unemployment duration analysis, and sex biased hiring. The third volume tackles some of the more controversial themes in modern labour economics. The editor has provided an insightful new introduction which gives a comprehensive overview of the themes discussed.

Full table of contents

Contents:

Volume I

Acknowledgements

Introduction John T. Addison

PART I LABOR DEMAND
1. Joshua D. Angrist (1996), ‘Short-Run Demand for Palestinian Labor’
2. Daniel S. Hamermesh and Stephen J. Trejo (2000), ‘The Demand for Hours of Labor: Direct Evidence from California’
3. Jennifer Hunt (1999), ‘Has Work-Sharing Worked in Germany?’
4. Daniel S. Hamermesh (1989), ‘Labor Demand and the Structure of Adjustment Costs’
5. Paolo Rota (2004), ‘Estimating Labor Demand with Fixed Costs’

PART II MINIMUM WAGES
6. David Card and Alan B. Krueger (2000), ‘Minimum Wages and Employment: A Case Study of the Fast-Food Industry in New Jersey and Pennsylvania: Reply’
7. John T. Addison and McKinley L. Blackburn (1999), ‘Minimum Wages and Poverty’
8. Barry T. Hirsch and Edward Schumacher (2005), ‘Classic or New Monopsony? Searching for Evidence in Nursing Labor Markets’
9. Pedro Portugal and Ana Rute Cardoso (2006), ‘Disentangling the Minimum Wage Puzzle: An Analysis of Worker Accessions and Separations from a Longitudinal-Matched Employer-Employee Data Set’

PART III LABOR SUPPLY
10. James J. Heckman (1993), ‘What Has Been Learned About Labor Supply in the Past Twenty Years?’
11. Jeff E. Biddle and Daniel S. Hamermesh (1990), ‘Sleep and the Allocation of Time’
12. Reuben Gronau (1997), ‘The Theory of Home Production: The Past Ten Years’
13. Joshua D. Angrist and William N. Evans (1998), ‘Children and Their Parents’ Labor Supply: Evidence from Exogenous Variation in Family Size’
14. Pierre-André Chiappori (1992), ‘Collective Labor Supply and Welfare’
15. M. Browning and P.A. Chiappori (1998), ‘Efficient Intra-Household Allocations: A General Characterization and Empirical Tests’
16. Shelly J. Lundberg, Robert A. Pollak and Terence J. Wales (1997), ‘Do Husbands and Wives Pool Their Resources? Evidence From the United Kingdom Child Benefit’
17. Henry S. Farber (2005), ‘Is Tomorrow Another Day? The Labor Supply of New York City Cabdrivers’
18. James P. Ziliak and Thomas J. Kneisner (2005), ‘The Effect of Income Taxation on Consumption and Labor Supply’

PART IV HUMAN CAPITAL
19. Kelly Bedard (2001), ‘Human Capital Versus Signaling Models: University Access and High School Dropouts’
20. McKinley L. Blackburn and David Neumark (1995), ‘Are OLS Estimates of the Return to Schooling Biased Downward? Another Look’
21. Orley Ashenfelter and Cecilia Rouse (1998), ‘Income, Schooling, and Ability: Evidence From a New Sample of Identical Twins’
22. Christian Belzil and Jörgen Hansen (2002), ‘Unobserved Ability and the Return to Schooling’
23. Janet Currie and Enrico Moretti (2003), ‘Mother’s Education and the Intergenerational Transmission of Human Capital: Evidence from College Openings’
24. Alan B. Krueger and Mikael Lindahl (2001), ‘Education for Growth: Why and For Whom?’
Name Index


Volume II

Acknowledgements

An introduction by the editor to all three volumes appears in Volume I

PART I COMPENSATING DIFFERENTIALS
1. Edward J. Schumacher and Barry T. Hirsch (1997), ‘Compensating Differentials and Unmeasured Ability in Labor Market for Nurses: Why Do Hospitals Pay More?’
2. Craig A. Olson (2002), ‘Do Workers Accept Lower Wages in Exchange for Health Benefits?’
3. Dominique Goux and Eric Maurin (1999), ‘Persistence of Interindustry Wage Differentials: A Reexamination Using Matched Worker-Firm Panel Data’

PART II THE RETURNS TO EXPERIENCE AND TENURE
4. David Neumark and Paul Taubman (1995), ‘Why Do Wage Profiles Slope Upward? Tests of the General Human Capital Model’
5. Robert Topel (1991), ‘Specific Capital, Mobility, and Wages: Wages Rise with Job Superiority’
6. Margaret Stevens (2003), ‘Earnings Functions, Specific Human Capital, and Job Matching: Tenure Bias is Negative’
7. Daniel Parent (2000), ‘Industry-Specific Capital and the Wage Profile: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and Panel Study of Income Dynamics’
8. Edward P. Lazear and Robert L. Moore (1984), ‘Incentives, Productivity, and Labor Contracts’
9. Edward P. Lazear (2000), ‘Performance Pay and Productivity’
10. H. Lorne Carmichael and W. Bentley MacLeod (2000), ‘Worker Cooperation and the Ratchet Effect’
11. Michael L. Bognanno (2001), ‘Corporate Tournaments’

PART III DISCRIMINATION
12. Daniel S. Hamermesh and Jeff E. Biddle (1994), ‘Beauty and the Labor Market’
13. Joseph G. Altonji and Charles R. Pierret (2001), ‘Employer Learning and Statistical Discrimination’
14. David A. McPherson and Barry T. Hirsch (1995), ‘Wages and Gender Composition: Why Do Women’s Jobs Pay Less?’
15. Derek A. Neal and William R. Johnson (1996), ‘The Role of Premarket Factors in Black-White Wage Differences’
16. Claudia Goldin and Cecilia Rouse (2000), ‘Orchestrating Impartiality: The Impact of “Blind” Auditions on Female Musicians’

PART IV JOB SEARCH AND UNEMPLOYMENT
17. Lars Ljungqvist and Thomas J. Sargent (1998), ‘The European Unemployment Dilemma’
18. John T. Addison and Pedro Portugal (2002), ‘Job Search Methods and Outcomes’
19. Bruce D. Meyer (1990), ‘Unemployment Insurance and Unemployment Spells’
20. John T. Addison and Pedro Portugal (2004), ‘How Does the Unemployment Insurance System Shape the Time Profile of Jobless Duration?’
21. Liliane Bonnal, Denis Fougère and Anne Sérandon (1997), ‘Evaluating the Impact of French Employment Policies on Individual Labor Market Histories’
22. John T. Addison and Pedro Portugal (2003), ‘Unemployment Duration: Competing and Defective Risks’

Name Index


Volume III

Acknowledgements

An introduction by the editor to all three volumes appears in Volume I

PART I TECHNOLOGY, TRADE, IMMIGRATION AND WAGES
1. Stephen Machin and John Van Reenen (1998), ‘Technology and Changes in Skill Structure: Evidence from Seven OECD Countries’
2. Eli Berman, John Bound and Stephen Machin (1998), ‘Implications of Skill-Based Technological Change: International Evidence’
3. Richard B. Freeman (1995), ‘Are Your Wages Set in Beijing?’
4. Thibaut Desjonqueres, Stephen Machin and John Van Reenen (1999), ‘Another Nail in the Coffin? Or Can the Trade Based Explanation of Changing Skill Structure Be Resurrected?’
5. David Card (2001), ‘Immigrant Inflows, Native Outflows, and the Local Labor Market Impacts of Higher Immigration’

PART II INSTITUTIONS AND LABOR MARKET OUTCOMES
6. Alan B. Krueger (1991), ‘The Evolution of Unjust-Dismissal Legislation in the United States’
7. John T. Addison, Paulino Teixeira and Jean-Luc Grosso (2000), ‘The Effect of Dismissals Protection on Employment: More on a Vexed Theme’
8. Stephen Nickell (1997), ‘Unemployment and Labor Market Rigidities: Europe Versus North America’
9. Olivier Blanchard and Justin Wolfers (2000), ‘The Role of Shocks and Institutions in the Rise of European Unemployment: The Aggregate Evidence’
10. Olivier Blanchard and Pedro Portugal (2001), ‘What Hides Behind an Unemployment Rate: Comparing Portuguese and U.S. Labor Markets’

PART III REGULATION SELECTED MANDATES
11. Lawrence H. Summers (1989), ‘Some Simple Economics of Mandated Benefits’
12. John T. Addison, Richard C. Barrett and W. Stanley Siebert (2006), ‘Building Blocks in the Economics of Mandates’
13. Jonathan Gruber (1994), ‘The Incidence of Mandated Maternity Benefits’
14. Christopher J. Ruhm (1998), ‘The Economic Consequences of Parental Leave Mandates: Lessons from Europe’

PART IV UNIONS
15. Barry T. Hirsch (2004), ‘What Do Unions Do for Economic Performance?’
16. John T. Addison and John B. Chilton (1998), ‘Self-Enforcing Union Contracts: Efficient Investment and Employment’
17. John T. Addison, John S. Heywood and Xiangdong Wei (2003), ‘New Evidence on Unions and Plant Closings: Britain in the 1990s’
18. John DiNardo and Kevin F. Hallock (2002), ‘When Unions “Mattered”: The Impact of Strikes on Financial Markets, 1925–1937’
19. Barry T. Hirsch (2004), ‘Reconsidering Union Wage Effects: Surveying New Evidence on an Old Topic’
20. John T. Addison, Ralph W. Bailey and W. Stanley Siebert (2007), ‘The Impact of Deunionization on Earnings Dispersion Revisited’
21. David Card (2001), ‘The Effect of Unions on Wage Inequality in the U.S. Labor Market’

PART V PERSONNEL ECONOMICS
22. Edward P. Lazear (1999), ‘Personnel Economics: Past Lessons and Future Directions. Presidential Address to the Society of Labor Economists, San Francisco, May 1, 1998’
23. Sandra E. Black and Lisa M. Lynch (2001), ‘How to Compete: The Impact of Workplace Practices and Information Technology on Productivity’
24. Stephen Machin and Stephen Wood (2005), ‘Human Resource Management as a Substitute for Trade Unions in British Workplaces’

Name Index



 
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