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The Economics Of Leisure

The Economics Of Leisure

Clem Tisdell

Edited by Clem Tisdell, Professor Emeritus, School of Economics, The University of Queensland, Australia

Two volume set 2006 1,040 pp Hardback 978 1 84064 823 2

Hardback £291.00 on-line price £261.90

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Series: The International Library of Critical Writings in Economics series






Description
‘The desire for leisure affects time allocation decisions and labour market behaviour in complex ways. More generally, leisure is a key element in the well-being of individuals and societies. Clem Tisdell is an ideal economist to bring the literature in this fascinating area together and the resulting volume will become an essential resource for anyone working in this field.’
– David Throsby, Macquarie University, Australia

Contents
55 articles, dating from 1930 to 2003 Contributors include: G.S. Becker, M. Bianchi, G. Cross, P. Dawkins, N. Hanley, S. Horrell, S.B. Linder, R.A. Musgrave, B.M.S. van Praag, T. Veblen

Further information

‘The desire for leisure affects time allocation decisions and labour market behaviour in complex ways. More generally, leisure is a key element in the well-being of individuals and societies. Clem Tisdell is an ideal economist to bring the literature in this fascinating area together and the resulting volume will become an essential resource for anyone working in this field.’
– David Throsby, Macquarie University, Australia

‘Clem Tisdell continues to surprise us! This two-volume collection is breath-taking in scope, from the grand theories of Thorstein Veblen and Gary Becker on work, leisure, and consumption, to some very specific contributions to empirical understanding of recreation choices and values. Major sections focus on the work–leisure choice, taxation and leisure, trends in available leisure time, and demand for specific leisure activities. Contributions by economists are methodologically eclectic, and there are some important contributions from other social sciences. In some cases, controversies are pursued through article, comment, and reply. Original publication dates range from 1899 (Veblen) to 2003. With this collection at hand, tunnel vision is impossible: the leisure researcher simply cannot get away with a narrow methodological approach disconnected from the broader history of ideas.’
– Alan Randall, University of Sydney, Australia

‘This book provides a comprehensive set of useful articles for reference purposes that address the economics of leisure and arranges these in a manner that assists the comprehension of the subject. The nature of the contribution of each article is highlighted in this overview which also helps to integrate the coverage of the collection. It provides an assessment of the current state of the available literature on the economics of leisure, identifies gaps in this literature and highlights areas that are worthy of more research effort.’
– From the introduction by Clem Tisdell

This authoritative two-volume collection presents a comprehensive set of key articles that address the economics of leisure, arranged in a manner that facilitates the understanding of the subject. The editor’s perceptive introduction highlights the contribution of each article, provides an assessment of the current state of the available literature and draws attention to those areas that are worthy of more research effort.

Volume I comprises perspectives on leisure and work as typified by Weber’s protestant ethic, Veblen’s theory of the leisure class, psychological economics, neoclassical economics and Becker’s theory of time allocation. Extensions and applications of the neoclassical theory of demand for leisure-time versus work and contributions on welfare attributes of leisure and the consequences of leisure for human well-being are also included.

In Volume II the impact of taxation on work-leisure choices is discussed, together with the demand for particular leisure commodities. Varied, and sometimes controversial, perspectives on the relationship between economic development and trends in leisure-time are explored, and miscellaneous topics such as voluntary labour, applications of characteristics theory, leisure and international trade, and changing technologies and leisure are also covered.

This book will be of immense interest to economists, sociologists, psychologists, and those involved in social and leisure studies.

Full table of contents

Contents:

Volume I

Acknowledgements

Preface
Introduction An Overview and Assessment of the Economics of Leisure Clem Tisdell

PART I SOME BASIC PERSPECTIVES
1. R.H. Tawney (1930), ‘Foreword’
2. Thorstein Veblen ([1899] 1934), ‘Conspicuous Leisure’
3. Gordon E. O’Brien (1988), ‘Work and Leisure’
4. Alfred W. Stonier and Douglas C. Hague ([1953] 1980), ‘The Supply Curve of Labour: (I) The Short Run’
5. Gary S. Becker (1965), ‘A Theory of the Allocation of Time’
PART II DEMAND FOR LEISURE-TIME VERSUS WORK: EXTENSIONS AND APPLICATIONS OF NEOCLASSICAL ECONOMICS
6. Leon N. Moses (1962), ‘Income, Leisure, and Wage Pressure’
7. T.J. Wales and A.D. Woodland (1977), ‘Estimation of the Allocation of Time for Work, Leisure, and Housework’
8. Reuben Gronau (1977), ‘Leisure, Home Production, and Work – the Theory of the Allocation of Time Revisited’
9. Sara Horrell (1994), ‘Household Time Allocation and Women’s Labour Force Participation’
10. L.F. Dunn (1978), ‘An Empirical Indifference Function for Income and Leisure’
11. B.K. Atrostic (1982), ‘The Demand for Leisure and Nonpecuniary Job Characteristics’
12. F. Thomas Juster and Frank P. Stafford (1991), ‘The Allocation of Time: Empirical Findings, Behavioral Models, and Problems of Measurement’
13. Daniel Hallberg (2003), ‘Synchronous Leisure, Jointness and Household Labor Supply’
14. Harl E. Ryder, Frank P. Stafford and Paula E. Stephan (1976), ‘Labor, Leisure and Training over the Life Cycle’
15. David H. Greenberg (1997), ‘The Leisure Bias in Cost–benefit Analyses of Employment and Training Programs’
16. Masako N. Darrough (1977), ‘A Model of Consumption and Leisure in an Intertemporal Framework: A Systematic Treatment Using Japanese Data’
PART III WELFARE AND LEISURE
17. Staffan Burenstam Linder (1970), ‘The Increasing Scarcity of Time’
18. Edmund S. Phelps (1973), ‘The Harried Leisure Class: A Demurrer’
19. Jiri Zuzanek, Theo Beckers and Pascale Peters (1998), ‘The “Harried Leisure Class” Revisited: Dutch and Canadian Trends in the Use of Time From the 1970s to the 1990s’
20. R.A. Musgrave (1974), ‘Maximin, Uncertainty, and the Leisure Trade-off’
21. Warren S. Gramm (1987), ‘Labor, Work, and Leisure: Human Well-Being and the Optimal Allocation of Time’
22. Jon D. Wisman (1998), ‘Christianity, John Paul II and the Future of Work’
23. Mary F. Kokoski (1987), ‘Indices of Household Welfare and the Value of Leisure Time’
24. B.M.S. van Praag, P. Frijters and A. Ferrer-i-Carbonell (2003), ‘The Anatomy of Subjective Well-being’
Name Index


Volume II

Acknowledgements

A preface and introduction by the editor to both volumes appears in Volume I

PART I PUBLIC ECONOMICS, TAXATION AND LEISURE
1. Thomas More and Thomas Stevens (2000), ‘Do User Fees Exclude Low-income People From Resource-based Recreation?’
2. Gordon Winston (1965), ‘Taxes, Leisure and Public Goods’
3. Robin Barlow and Gordon R. Sparks (1964), ‘A Note on Progression and Leisure’
4. J.G. Head (1966), ‘A Note on Progression and Leisure: Comment’
5. Robin Barlow and Gordon R. Sparks (1966), ‘A Note on Progression and Leisure: Reply’
6. John Conlisk (1968), ‘Simple Dynamic Effects in Work-Leisure Choice: A Skeptical Comment on the Static Theory’
7. Gideon Fishelson (1971), ‘Simple Dynamic Effects in Work-Leisure Choice: A Rejoinder to the Skeptical Comment on the Static Theory’
8. M.G. Allingham (1972), ‘Progression and Leisure’
9. Manuel A. Gómez (2003), ‘Effects of Flat-rate Taxes: To What Extent Does the Leisure Specification Matter?’
PART II DEMAND FOR PARTICULAR LEISURE ACTIVITIES
10. George A. Chressanthis (1994), ‘The Demand for Chess in the United States, 1946–1990’
11. Marina Bianchi (1997), ‘Collecting as a Paradigm of Consumption’
12. Lee G. Anderson (1983), ‘The Demand Curve for Recreational Fishing with an Application to Stock Enhancement Activities’
13. Sarah Wheeler and Richard Damania (2001), ‘Valuing New Zealand Recreational Fishing and an Assessment of the Validity of the Contingent Valuation Estimates’
14. John A. Curtis (2003), ‘Demand for Water-based Leisure Activity’
15. Eugene M. Christiansen (1998), ‘Gambling and the American Economy’
16. Cheryl K. Baldwin and Patricia A. Norris (1999), ‘Exploring the Dimensions of Serious Leisure: “Love Me – Love My Dog!”’
17. Richard L. Celsi, Randall L. Rose and Thomas W. Leigh (1993), ‘An Exploration of High-Risk Leisure Consumption Through Skydiving’
PART III TRENDS IN AVAILABLE LEISURE TIME
18. Marshall Sahlins (1974), ‘The Original Affluent Society’
19. Phyllis Deane (1979), ‘2. Standards of Living and Productivity’
20. P. Mathias (1979), ‘Leisure and Wages in Theory and Practice’
21. Gary Cross (1993), ‘Modern Dilemmas of Time and Money’
22. Frank P. Stafford (1992), ‘The Overworked American. The Unexpected Decline of Leisure – A Review’
23. Thomas J. Kniesner (1976), ‘The Full-Time Workweek in the United States, 1900–1970’
24. Philip L. Rones, Randy E. Ilg and Jennifer M. Gardner (1997), ‘Trends in Hours of Work Since the Mid-1970s’
25. Peter Dawkins and Michael Simpson (1994), ‘Work, Leisure and the Competitiveness of Australian Industry’
26. Dora L. Costa (1998), ‘The Unequal Work Day: A Long-Term View’ PART IV MISCELLANEOUS CONTRIBUTIONS TO LEISURE ECONOMICS
27. Richard B. Freeman (1997), ‘Working for Nothing: The Supply of Volunteer Labor’
28. Kelvin J. Lancaster (1966), ‘A New Approach to Consumer Theory’
29. V.C. Walsh (1956), ‘Leisure and International Trade’
30. David Darton and Gerard O’Neill (1988), ‘The Changing Role of the Household Economy in a World of Expanding Technology’
31. Begoña Álvarez-Farizo, Nick Hanley and Ramón Barberán (2001), ‘The Value of Leisure Time: A Contingent Rating Approach’
Name Index



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