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Models Of Capitalism: Debating Strengths And Weaknesses

Models Of Capitalism: Debating Strengths And Weaknesses

David Coates

Edited by David Coates, Worrell Professor of Anglo-American Studies, Wake Forest University, US

Three volume set 2002 1,680 pp Hardback 978 1 84064 440 1

Hardback £455.00 on-line price £409.50

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Series: Elgar Mini Series






Description
‘Gathered together in this collection are all the main scholarly contributions to a set of crucial debates concerning the degree of convergence and divergence in the trajectory of modern capitalism, and the viability of different models of capitalism. Scholars working at the boundaries of political science, economics and sociology will find this three-volume collection indispensable for both research and teaching purposes.’
– Chris Howell, Oberlin College, US

The literature on the character, determinants and relative performance of the leading industrial economies has developed rapidly of late. However many of the most important pieces of writing are now slipping from view because they were originally published in different, often inaccessible and highly specialised academic journals. These three volumes bring together those key articles and provide a new introductory commentary on the literature.

This authoritative collection provides the reader with easy access to the full range of arguments now being developed to explain why some forms of economic organisation prospered best in the immediate past, and why some models now seem more effective than others in responding to the new global conditions of intensified international competition and rapid capital mobility.

Contents
63 articles, dating from 1983 to 2001 Contributors include: R. Boyer, B. Brenner, R. Dore, J.R. Hollingsworth, W. Lazonick, J. Pontusson, D. Soskice, W. Streeck, L. Weiss, J. Zysman

Further information

‘Gathered together in this collection are all the main scholarly contributions to a set of crucial debates concerning the degree of convergence and divergence in the trajectory of modern capitalism, and the viability of different models of capitalism. Scholars working at the boundaries of political science, economics and sociology will find this three-volume collection indispensable for both research and teaching purposes.’
– Chris Howell, Oberlin College, US

The literature on the character, determinants and relative performance of the leading industrial economies has developed rapidly of late. However many of the most important pieces of writing are now slipping from view because they were originally published in different, often inaccessible and highly specialised academic journals. These three volumes bring together those key articles and provide a new introductory commentary on the literature.

This authoritative collection provides the reader with easy access to the full range of arguments now being developed to explain why some forms of economic organisation prospered best in the immediate past, and why some models now seem more effective than others in responding to the new global conditions of intensified international competition and rapid capital mobility.

These volumes will be an indispensable reference source for students and researchers specialising in modern capitalism.

Full table of contents

Contents:
Volume I: Capitalist Models: Divergence and Convergence
Acknowledgements
Introduction David Coates
PART I TYPOLOGIES OF NATIONAL SYSTEMS
1. Barbara Stallings and Wolfgang Streeck (1995), ‘Capitalisms in Conflict? The United States, Europe, and Japan in the Post-Cold War World (1995)’
2. Will Hutton (1994), ‘The Political Economy of the World’s Capitalisms’
3. Harold Perkin (1996), ‘The Third Revolution and Stakeholder Capitalism: Convergence or Collapse?’
4. William Lazonick (1992), ‘Business Organization and Competitive Advantage: Capitalist Transformations in the Twentieth Century’
5. Robert A. Boyer (2001), ‘The Diversity and Future of Capitalisms: A Régulationnist Analysis’
6. David Soskice (1990), ‘Reinterpreting Corporatism and Explaining Unemployment: Co-ordinated and Non-co-ordinated Market Economies’
PART II TYPOLOGIES OF NATIONAL SUB-SYSTEMS
7. Chris Freeman (1995), ‘The "National System of Innovation" in Historical Perspective’
8. Richard Whitley (1994), ‘Dominant Forms of Economic Organization in Market Economies’
9. John Zysman (1983), ‘Finance and the Politics of Industry’
10. Ian Holliday (2000), ‘Productivist Welfare Capitalism: Social Policy in East Asia’
11. Stephen J. Frenkel (1986), ‘Industrial Sociology and Workplace Relations in Advanced Capitalist Societies’
PART III THE CONVERGENCE OF NATIONAL SYSTEMS
12. James E. Cronin (2000), ‘Covergence by Conviction: Politics and Economics in the Emergence of the "Anglo-American" Model’
13. John Zysman (1996), ‘The Myth of a Global Economy: Enduring National Foundations and Emerging Regional Realities’
14. Colin Hay (2000), ‘Contemporary Capitalism, Globalization, Regionalization and the Persistence of National Variation’
15. Herbert Kitschelt, Peter Lange, Gary Marks and John D. Stephens (1999), ‘Convergence and Divergence in Advanced Capitalist Democracies’
16. Ronald Dore, William Lazonick and Mary O’Sullivan (1999), ‘Varieties of Capitalism in the Twentieth Century’
17. Hugo Radice (1998), ‘"Globalization" and National Differences’
PART IV THEORIZING CONVERGENCE AND DIFFERENCE
18. Bruno Amable (2000), ‘Institutional Complementarity and Diversity of Social Systems of Innovation and Production’
19. Hugo Radice (2000), ‘Globalization and National Capitalisms: Theorizing Convergence and Differentiation’
Name Index

Volume II: Capitalist Models Under Challenge
Acknowledgements
Introduction David Coates
PART I JAPANESE CAPITALISM
1. Ronald Dore (1993), ‘What Makes the Japanese Different?’
2. Michael Gerlach (1989), ‘Keiretsu Organization in the Japanese Economy: Analysis and Trade Implications’
3. Knuth Dohse, Ulrich Jürgens and Thomas Malsch (1985), ‘From "Fordism" to "Toyotism"? The Social Organization of the Labor Process in the Japanese Automobile Industry’
4. Paul Burkett and Martin Hart-Landsberg (1996), ‘The Use and Abuse of Japan as a Progressive Model’
5. William K. Tabb (1999), ‘The End of the Japanese Postwar System’
6. Ronald Dore (1998), ‘Asian Crisis and the Future of the Japanese Model’
PART II EAST ASIAN INDUSTRIALIZATION: THE CASE OF SOUTH KOREA
7. Richard Child Hill and Kuniko Fujita (1996), ‘Flying Geese, Swarming Sparrows or Preying Hawks? Perspectives on East Asian Industrialization’
8. Jeffrey Henderson (1993), ‘Against the Economic Orthodoxy: On the Making of the East Asian Miracle’
9. Alice H. Amsden (1990), ‘Third World Industrialization: "Global Fordism" or a New Model?’
10. Stephen Haggard and Jongryn Mo (2000), ‘The Political Economy of the Korean Financial Crisis’
11. Dic Lo (1999), ‘The East Asian Phenomenon: The Consensus, the Dissent, and the Significance of the Present Crisis’
12. Linda Weiss (1999), ‘State Power and the Asian Crisis’
PART III THE GERMAN MODEL
13. Michel Albert and Rauf Gonenc (1996), ‘The Future of Rhenish Capitalism’
14. Wolfgang Streeck (1997), ‘German Capitalism: Does it Exist? Can it Survive?’
15. Wendy Carlin and David Soskice (1997), ‘Shocks to the System: The German Political Economy Under Stress’
16. Anke Hassel (1999), ‘The Erosion of the German System of Industrial Relations’
17. Pepper D. Culpepper (1999), ‘The Future of the High-Skill Equilibrium in Germany’
18. Kathleen Thalen and Ikuo Kume (1999), ‘The Effects of Globalization on Labor Revisited: Lessons from Germany and Japan’
PART IV THE SWEDISH MODEL
19. Rudolf Meidner (1993), ‘Why Did the Swedish Model Fail?’
20. Jonas Pontusson (1992), ‘At the End of the Third Road: Swedish Social Democracy in Crisis’
21. Stuart Wilks (1996), ‘Class Compromise and the International Economy: The Rise and Fall of Swedish Social Democracy’
PART V EUROPEAN WELFARE CAPITALISM
22. Assar Lindbeck (1985), ‘What is Wrong with the West European Economies?’
23. Ian Gough (1996), ‘Social Welfare and Competitiveness’
24. John Grahl and Paul Teague (1997), ‘Is the European Social Model Fragmenting?’
Name Index

Volume III: The Ascendancy of Liberal Capitalism
Acknowledgements
Introduction David Coates
PART I LIBERAL CAPITALISM: USA
1. J. Rogers Hollingsworth (1997), ‘The Institutional Embeddedness of American Capitalism’
2. Stephen D. Cohen (1995), ‘Does the United States Have an International Competitiveness Problem?’
3. Moses Abramovitz and Paul A. David (1996), ‘Convergence and Deferred Catch-up: Productivity Leadership and the Waning of American Exceptionalism’
4. David M. Gordon (1994), ‘Chickens Home to Roost: From Prosperity to Stagnation in the Postwar U.S. Economy’
5. Julie Froud, Colin Haslam, Sukhdev Johal, Jean Shaoul and Karel Williams (1996), ‘Sinking Ships? Liberal Theorists and the American Economy’
6. Richard B. Freeman (2000), ‘The US Economic Model at Y2K: Lodestar for Advanced Capitalism?’
7. Robert Brenner (2000), ‘The Boom and the Bubble’
PART II: LIBERAL CAPITALISM: THE UK
8. Bernard Elbaum and William Lazonick (1984), ‘The Decline of the British Economy: An Institutional Perspective’
9. David Finegold and David Soskice (1988), ‘The Failure of Training in Britain: Analysis and Prescription’
10. Jill Rubery (1994), ‘The British Production Regime: A Societal-specific System?’
11. Christel Lane (1992), ‘European Business Systems: Britain and Germany Compared’
12. Martha Prevezer (1994), ‘Overview: Capital and Control: City-Industry Relations’
13. Karel Williams, John Williams and Colin Haslam (1990), ‘The Hollowing Out of British Manufacturing and Its Implications for Policy’
14. Hugo Radice (1999), ‘Britain Under "New Labour": A Model for European Restructuring?’
15. David Coates (1999), ‘Models of Capitalism in the New World Order: The UK Case’
PART III THE MODELS COMPARED
16. J. Rogers Hollingsworth (1997), ‘Continuities and Changes in Social Systems of Production: The Cases of Japan, Germany and the United States’
17. William Lazonick and Mary O’Sullivan (1997), ‘Finance and Industrial Development. Part I: The United States and the United Kingdom’
18. William Lazonick and Mary O’Sullivan (1997), ‘Finance and Industrial Development. Part II: Japan and Germany’
19. Robert Buchele and Jens Christiansen (1998), ‘Do Employment and Income Security Cause Unemployment?: A Comparative Study of the US and the E-4’
20. Ronald Dore (2000), ‘Will Global Capitalism be Anglo-Saxon Capitalism?’
Name Index



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