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Agricultural Policy

Agricultural Policy

Wyn P. Grant , John T.S. Keeler

Edited by Wyn P. Grant, Professor of Politics, University of Warwick, UK and John T.S. Keeler, Professor of Political Science and Director, European Union Center, University of Washington, Seattle, US

Two volume set 2000 968 pp Hardback 978 1 85898 890 0

Hardback £286.00 on-line price £257.40

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Series: The International Library of Comparative Public Policy series






Description
‘This large collection of forty-eight articles is extremely useful for specialists in agricultural policy and showcases the strengths in this literature. It provides convenient access to a wealth of information on agricultural policy and the factors driving its development, particularly within Europe. . . . The strength of this collection is its disciplinary breadth. The editors have selected articles from economics, sociology, public administration, political science, and public policy journals.’
– Elizabeth Moore, Canadian Public Administration

Agricultural politics and policy retain a central place in the politics of advanced industrial societies. Governments in most countries continue to subsidise agricultural production and regulate markets for farm commodities. The growth of concern about the environmental impact of agriculture has added a new dimension to the sector’s politics. Tensions between the US and the EU over the protection of agriculture remain a major feature. New Zealand offers an interesting example of an experiment with deregulated and liberalised agriculture, while Japanese agriculture continues to be highly protected. All these topics are covered in this two volume set, which brings together the best writing on the subject from leading agricultural economists, political scientists and rural sociologists from across the world.

Contents
48 articles, dating from 1979 to 1999 Contributors include: W.D. Coleman, T.E. Josling, A.G. Mulgan, R. Paarlberg, G. Skogstad, A. Swinbank, D. Webber

Further information

‘This large collection of forty-eight articles is extremely useful for specialists in agricultural policy and showcases the strengths in this literature. It provides convenient access to a wealth of information on agricultural policy and the factors driving its development, particularly within Europe. . . . The strength of this collection is its disciplinary breadth. The editors have selected articles from economics, sociology, public administration, political science, and public policy journals.’
– Elizabeth Moore, Canadian Public Administration

Agricultural politics and policy retain a central place in the politics of advanced industrial societies. Governments in most countries continue to subsidise agricultural production and regulate markets for farm commodities. The growth of concern about the environmental impact of agriculture has added a new dimension to the sector’s politics. Tensions between the US and the EU over the protection of agriculture remain a major feature. New Zealand offers an interesting example of an experiment with deregulated and liberalised agriculture, while Japanese agriculture continues to be highly protected. All these topics are covered in this two volume set, which brings together the best writing on the subject from leading agricultural economists, political scientists and rural sociologists from across the world.

Full table of contents

Contents:

Volume I: Agricultural Policy in Western Europe
Acknowledgements • Introduction

Part I Theoretical Perspectives
1. Johan F.M. Swinnen (1994), ‘A Positive Theory of Agricultural Protection’
2. Grant Jordan, William A. Maloney and Andrew M. McLaughlin (1994), ‘Characterizing Agricultural Policy-making’
3. Martin J. Smith (1989), ‘Changing Agendas and Policy Communities: Agricultural Issues in the 1930s and 1980s’
4. John T.S. Keeler (1981), ‘Corporatism and Official Union Hegemony: The Case of French Agricultural Syndicalism’
5. Neil Collins (1995), ‘Agricultural Policy Networks of the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland’
6. Martin J. Smith (1991), ‘From Policy Community to Issue Network: Salmonella in Eggs and the New Politics of Food’
7. William D. Coleman, Grace D. Skogstad and Michael M. Atkinson (1997), ‘Paradigm Shifts and Policy Networks: Cumulative Change in Agriculture’
8. Harriet Friedmann and Philip McMichael (1989), ‘Agriculture and the State System: The Rise and Decline of National Agricultures, 1870 to the Present’
Part II The Common Agricultural Policy and the Politics of Reform
9. Rosemary Fennell (1985), ‘A Reconsideration of the Objectives of the Common Agricultural Policy’
10. Alan Swinbank (1989), ‘The Common Agricultural Policy and the Politics of European Decision Making’
11. Eduardo Moyano Estrada (1995), ‘Farmers’ Unions and the Restructuring of European Agriculture’
12. Alan Swinbank (1993), ‘CAP Reform, 1992’
13. H. Wayne Moyer (1993), ‘The European Community and the GATT Uruguay Round: Preserving the Common Agricultural Policy at All Costs’
14. Wyn Grant (1995), ‘The Limits of Common Agricultural Policy Reform and the Option of Denationalization’
15. John T.S. Keeler (1996), ‘Agricultural Power in the European Community: Explaining the Fate of CAP and GATT Negotiations’
16. L.P. Mahé and T.L. Roe (1996), ‘The Political Economy of Reforming the 1992 CAP Reform,’
17. Douglas Webber (1998), ‘High Midnight in Brussels: An Analysis of the September 1993 Council Meeting on the GATT Uruguay Round’
Part III National Perspectives on Agricultural Reform
18. Paul J. Epstein (1997), ‘Beyond Policy Community: French Agriculture and the GATT’
19. William James Adams (1999), ‘The Political Economy of Agriculture in France’s Fifth Republic’
20. Carsten Daugbjerg (1997), ‘Policy Networks and Agricultural Policy Reforms: Explaining Deregulation in Sweden and Re-Regulation in the European Community’
21. S. von Cramon-Taubadel (1993), ‘The Reform of the CAP from a German Perspective’
22. Enrico Capo (1995), ‘Transformation and Development in Italian Rural Society’
23. Andrew Fearne (1991), ‘The Administration of EC Agricultural Policies by National Agencies’
Name Index

Volume II: Agricultural Policy in Global Perspective

Part I Agricultural Trade and the Liberalization Trend
1. T.E. Josling (1993), ‘Agriculture in a World of Trading Blocs’
2. David Blandford and Joe Dewbre (1994), ‘Structural Adjustment and Learning to Live Without Subsidies in OECD Countries’
3. Robert Paarlberg (1997), ‘Agricultural Policy Reform and the Uruguay Round: Synergistic Linkage in a Two-Level Game’
4. Judith Goldstein (1989), ‘The Impact of Ideas on Trade Policy: The Origins of U.S. Agricultural and Manufacturing Policies’
Part II The Challenge of Agricultural Reform: Three Case Studies
A The United States
5. Kenneth Finegold (1981), ‘From Agrarianism to Adjustment: The Political Origins of New Deal Agricultural Policy’
6. Gregory Hooks (1990), ‘From an Autonomous to a Captured State Agency: The Decline of the New Deal in Agriculture’
7. Bruce L. Gardner (1996), ‘The Federal Government in Farm Commodity Markets: Recent Reform Efforts in a Long-Term Context’
8. Robert Paarlberg and David Orden (1996), ‘Explaining U.S. Farm Policy in 1996 and Beyond: Changes in Party Control and Changing Market Conditions’
9. William D. Coleman, Michael M. Atkinson and Eric Montpetit (1997), ‘Against the Odds: Retrenchment in Agriculture in France and the United States’
B New Zealand
10. Paul Cloke (1989), ‘State Deregulation and New Zealand’s Agricultural Sector’
11. Warren E. Johnston and Gerald A.G. Frengley (1994), ‘Economic Adjustments and Changes in Financial Viability of the Farming Sector: The New Zealand Experience’
12. Ron A. Sandrey and Grant M. Scobie (1994), ‘Changing International Competitiveness and Trade: Recent Experience in New Zealand Agriculture’
13. Bruce L. Gardner (1994), ‘Liberalization in New Zealand Agriculture: Discussion’
14. F.G. Scrimgeour and E.C. Pasour, Jr. (1996), ‘A Public Choice Perspective on Agricultural Policy Reform: Implications of the New Zealand Experience’
C Japan
15. Aurelia George (1991), ‘The Politics of Interest Representation in the Japanese Diet: The Case of Agriculture’
16. Aurelia George Mulgan (1997), ‘The Role of Foreign Pressure (Gaiatsu) in Japan’s Agricultural Trade Liberalization’
17. Robert L. Paarlberg (1990), ‘The Upside-Down World of US–Japanese Agricultural Trade’
18. Yamaji Susumu (1979), ‘The Unsung Mainstays (2): Agriculture’
19. Karel van Wolferen (1989), ‘The System at Work in Rural Japan’
Part III Agro-Environmental Policy
20. David Baldock (1992), ‘The Polluter Pays Principle and Its Relevance to Agricultural Policy in European Countries’
21. Pieter Glasbergen (1992), ‘Agro-Environmental Policy: Trapped in an Iron Law? A Comparative Analysis of Agricultural Pollution Control in the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and France’
22. Jaap Frouws and Jan van Tatenhove (1993), ‘Agriculture, Environment and the State: The Development of Agro-Environmental Policy-Making in the Netherlands’
23. Karl Bruckmeier and Parto Teherani-Krönner (1992), ‘Farmers and Environmental Regulation: Experiences in the Federal Republic of Germany’
24. Torben Bager and Jet Proost (1997), ‘Voluntary Regulation and Farmers’ Environmental Behaviour in Denmark and The Netherlands’
25. Reidar Almås (1994), ‘The Rise and Fall of Agricultural Policy Cycles: from Planned Economy to Green Liberalism’
Name Index



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