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International Criminal Law

International Criminal Law

William A. Schabas

Edited by William A. Schabas, Professor of International Law, Middlesex University (London), UK and Professor of International Criminal Law and Human Rights, Leiden University, The Netherlands

Three volume set 2012 2,808 pp Hardback 978 1 84844 975 6

Hardback £778.00 on-line price £700.20

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Series: International Law series






Description
‘In this helpful collection, Professor Schabas introduces the reader to the whole subject of international criminal law – an area which has witnessed a tremendous increase in attention, especially after the recent events in Northern Africa and the Middle East. The selected literature and introduction are very informative and offer guidance for further reading if desired.’
– Otto Triffterer, Paris-Lodron-University, Salzburg, Austria

Contents
74 articles, dating from 1958 to 2009 Contributors include: M. Bassiouni, A. Cullen, D. Forsythe, C. Garraway, M. Lippman, D. Robinson, J. Sarkin, D. Scheffer, C. Stahn, M. Zeidy

Further information

‘. . . should be given pride of place on the bookshelves of all international criminal lawyers, as well as historians and others interested in this subject: as we say, it is a fascinating compilation from the leading scholars of the age.’
– Phillip Taylor and Elizabeth Taylor, The Barrister Magazine

‘In this helpful collection, Professor Schabas introduces the reader to the whole subject of international criminal law – an area which has witnessed a tremendous increase in attention, especially after the recent events in Northern Africa and the Middle East. The selected literature and introduction are very informative and offer guidance for further reading if desired.’
– Otto Triffterer, Paris-Lodron-University, Salzburg, Austria

International criminal law and the international courts and tribunals that administer it have witnessed a surge in interest over the past two decades, and it occupies an increasingly prominent position on the legal landscape. This topical collection, prepared by an eminent authority in international criminal law, successfully brings together a cross-section of the most important literature, providing a unique overview of the discipline. Areas covered in this three-volume collection include the origins of international law, the general principles, procedure and evidence, alternatives to prosecution as well as national systems. This important publication will be a valuable reference tool for scholars, academics and practitioners in the field of international criminal law.

Full table of contents

Contents:

Volume I

Acknowledgements

Introduction
William A. Schabas

PART I ORIGINS AND DEVELOPMENT OF INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL LAW
1. Christopher Keith Hall (1998), ‘The First Proposal for a Permanent International Criminal Court’
2. M. Cherif Bassiouni (1997), ‘From Versailles to Rwanda in Seventy-Five Years: The Need to Establish a Permanent International Criminal Court’
3. Arieh J. Kochavi (1994), ‘The British Foreign Office versus the United Nations War Crimes Commission during the Second World War’
4. Hans Kelsen (1947), ‘Will the Judgment in the Nuremberg Trial Constitute a Precedent in International Law?’
5. William A. Schabas (2008), ‘Origins of the Genocide Convention: From Nuremberg to Paris’
6. L.C. Green (1960), ‘The Eichmann Case’
7. Matthew Lippman (1982), ‘The Trial of Adolf Eichmann and the Protection of Universal Human Rights under International Law’
8. M. Cherif Bassiouni (2003), ‘The History of the Draft Code of Crimes Against the Peace and Security of Mankind’
9. James Crawford (1995), ‘The ILC Adopts a Statute for an International Criminal Court’
10. Larry D. Johnson (2004), ‘Ten Years Later: Reflections on the Drafting’
11. David J. Scheffer (2004), ‘Three Memories from the Year of Origin, 1993’
12. M. Cherif Bassiouni (1999), ‘Negotiating the Treaty of Rome on the Establishment of an International Criminal Court’
13. Philippe Kirsch, Q.C. and Valerie Oosterveld (2001), ‘Negotiating an Insitution for the Twenty-First Century: Multilateral Diplomacy and the International Criminal Court’
14. Leila Nadya Sadat (2003), ‘Summer in Rome, Spring in The Hague, Winter in Washington? U.S. Policy Towards the International Criminal Court’

PART II INTERNATIONAL CRIMES
15. Raphael Lemkin (1947), ‘Genocide as a Crime under International Law’
16. Alexander K.A. Greenawalt (1999), ‘Rethinking Genocidal Intent: The Case for a Knowledge-Based Interpretation’
17. Claus Kreß (2006), ‘The Crime of Genocide under International Law’
18. Egon Schwelb (1946), ‘Crimes Against Humanity’
19. Darryl Robinson (1999), ‘Defining “Crimes Against Humanity” at the Rome Conference’
20. Noah Weisbord (2008), ‘Prosecuting Aggression’
21. David Scheffer (2006), ‘Genocide and Atrocity Crimes’
22. Kelly D. Askin (2003), ‘Prosecuting Wartime Rape and Other Gender-Related Crimes under International Law: Extraordinary Advances, Enduring Obstacles’
23. Anthony Cullen (2008), ‘The Definition of Non-International Armed Conflict in the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court: An Analysis of the Threshold of Application Contained in Article 8(2)(f)’

PART III THE PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICS OF INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL LAW
24. Theodor Meron (1995), ‘International Criminalization of Internal Atrocities’
25. José E. Alvarez (1999), ‘Crimes of States/Crimes of Hate: Lessons from Rwanda’
26. Mark Osiel (2000), ‘Why Prosecute? Critics of Punishment for Mass Atrocity’
27. Mark A. Drumbl (2000), ‘Punishment, Postgenocide: From Guilt to Shame to Civis in Rwanda’
28. Payam Akhavan (2001), ‘Beyond Impunity: Can International Criminal Justice Prevent Future Atrocities?’
29. David P. Forsythe (2002), ‘The United States and International Criminal Justice’
30. Tzvetan Todorov (2009), ‘Memory as Remedy for Evil’


Volume II

Acknowledgements

An introduction to all three volumes by the editor appears in Volume I

PART I GENERAL PRINCIPLES, PROCEDURE AND EVIDENCE
1. Beth van Schaack (2008), ‘Crimen Sine Lege: Judicial Lawmaking at the Intersection of Law and Morals’
2. Roger S. Clark (2002), ‘The Mental Element in International Criminal Law: The Rome Statute of the Interntional Criminal Court and the Elements of Offences’
3. Mohamed Elewa Badar (2006), ‘Drawing the Boundaries of Mens Rea in the Jurisprudence of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia’
4. Allison Marston Danner and Jenny S. Martinez (2006), ‘Guilty Associations: Joint Criminal Enterprise, Command Responsibility, and the Development of International Criminal Law’
5. Dapo Akande (2004), ‘International Law Immunities and the International Criminal Court’
6. Charles Garraway (1999), ‘Superior Orders and the International Criminal Court: Justice Delivered or Justice Denied’
7. Theodor Meron (2004), ‘Procedural Evolution in the ICTY’
8. Gideon Boas (2001), ‘Creating Laws of Evidence for International Criminal Law: The ICTY and the Principle of Flexibility’
9. Megan Fairlie (2004), ‘The Marriage of Common and Continental Law at the ICTY and its Progeny, Due Process Deficit’
10. Mirjan Damaška (2001), ‘The Shadow Side of Command Responsibility’
11. Alexander Zahar (2001), ‘Command Responsibility of Civilian Superiors for Genocide’
12. Wibke Kristin Timmermann (2006), ‘Incitement in International Criminal Law’
13. Nancy Amoury Combs (2002), ‘Copping a Plea to Genocide: The Plea Bargaining of International Crimes’

PART II RULE OF LAW, AMNESTY AND ALTERNATIVES TO PROSECUTION
14. Diane F. Orentlicher (1991), ‘Settling Accounts: The Duty to Prosecute Human Rights Violations of a Prior Regime’
15. Louise Mallinder (2010), ‘Beyond the Courts? The Complex Relationship of Trials and Amnesties’
16. Jeremy Sarkin (2001), ‘The Tension Between Justice and Reconciliation in Rwanda: Politics, Human Rights, Due Process and the Role of the Gacaca Courts in Dealing with the Genocide’
17. William A. Schabas (2003), ‘The Relationship Between Truth Commissions and International Courts: The Case of Sierra Leone’
18. Anja Seibert-Fohr (2003), ‘The Relevance of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court for Amnesties and Truth Commissions’


Volume III

Acknowledgements

An introduction to all three volumes by the editor appears in Volume I

PART I THE AD HOC AND ‘HYBRID’ TRIBUNALS, AND NATIONAL SYSTEMS
1. M. Cherif Bassiouni (1994), ‘The Commission of Experts Established pursuant to Security Council Resolution 780: Investigating Violations of International Humanitarian Law in the Former Yugoslavia’
2. Patricia M. Wald (2001), ‘The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia Comes of Age: Some Observations on Day-to-Day Dilemmas of an International Court’
3. Daryl A. Mundis (2005), ‘The Judicial Effects of the “Completion Strategies” on the Ad Hoc International Criminal Tribunals’
4. David Wippman (2006), ‘The Costs of International Justice’
5. Mirko Klarin (2004), ‘The Tribunal’s Four Battles’
6. William A. Schabas (2009), ‘Anti-Complementarity: Referral to National Jurisdictions by the UN International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda’
7. Laura A. Dickinson (2003), ‘The Promise of Hybrid Courts’
8. Mark S. Ellis (2004), ‘Coming to Terms with its Past – Serbia’s New Court for the Prosecution of War Crimes’
9. Leila Sadat Wexler (1994), ‘The Interpretation of the Nuremberg Principles by the French Court of Cassation: From Touvier to Barbie and Back Again’

PART II THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT
10. Olympia Bekou and Robert Cryer (2007), ‘The International Criminal Court and Universal Jurisdiction: A Close Encounter?’
11. William W. Burke-White (2008), ‘Proactive Complementarity: The International Criminal Court and National Courts in the Rome System of International Justice’
12. Andrew T. Cayley (2008), ‘The Prosecutor’s Strategy in Seeking the Arrest of Sudanese President Al Bashir on Charges of Genocide’
13. Allison Marston Danner (2003), ‘Enhancing the Legitimacy and Accountability of Prosecutorial Discretion at the International Criminal Court’
14. Margaret M. deGuzman (2009), ‘Gravity and the Legitimacy of the International Criminal Court’
15. Mohamed El Zeidy (2002), ‘The United States Dropped the Atomic Bomb of Article 16 of the ICC Statute: Security Council Power of Deferrals and Resolution 1422’
16. Silvia A. Fernández de Gurmendi and Håkan Friman (2000), ‘The Rules of Procedure and Evidence of the International Criminal Court’
17. Valerie Oosterveld, Mike Perry and John McManus (2002), ‘The Cooperation of States with the International Criminal Court’
18. Sienho Yee (1996), ‘A Proposal to Reformulate Article 23 of the ILC Draft Statute for an International Criminal Court’
19. David J. Scheffer (2001), ‘A Negotiator’s Perspective on the International Criminal Court’
20. William A. Schabas (2000), ‘Life, Death and the Crime of Crimes: Supreme Penalties and the ICC Statute’
21. Ray Murphy (2006), ‘Gravity Issues and the International Criminal Court’
22. Rod Rastan (2008), ‘What is a “Case” for the Purpose of the Rome Statute?’
23. Nicolaos Strapatsas (2002), ‘Universal Jurisdiction and the International Criminal Court’
24. Carsten Stahn (2005), ‘Complementarity, Amnesties and Alternative Forms of Justice: Some Interpretative Guidelines for the International Criminal Court’
25. Carsten Stahn, Mohamed M. El Zeidy and Héctor Olásolo (2005), ‘The International Criminal Court’s Ad hoc Jurisdiction Revisited’
26. M. Cherif Bassiouni (2010), ‘Perpectives on International Criminal Justice’



 
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