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The Economic Development Of Modern Japan, 1868–1945

The Economic Development Of Modern Japan, 1868–1945

From the Meiji Restoration to the Second World War

Steven Tolliday

Edited by Steven Tolliday, Professor of Economic and Social History, University of Leeds, UK

Two volume set 2001 1,392 pp Hardback 978 1 85898 190 1

Hardback £392.00 on-line price £352.80

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Series: Elgar Mini Series






Description
‘It is consequently important to conclude by praising Tolliday for his achievement, given the undoubted quality of what has been included. Moreover, he has also edited a two-volume set covering the period 1945–95, allowing those who teach this subject to provide reading lists that ought to be much more focused.’
– John F. Wilson, The Economic History

‘The quality of Japanese record keeping and the energies of the authors brought together in this collection have made Japan the most richly documented of all examples of late industrialisation. Tolliday has done a discriminating dual-purpose job. He provides a splendid overall conspectus for someone coming new to the subject, and for those already seized by its fascination, easy access to a wide range of literature buried in the sort of journal you always find your library doesn’t take.’
– Ronald Dore, London School of Economics and Political Science, UK

This authoritative collection presents the key contributions on the economic history of Japan from the Meiji Restoration to the Second World War. It covers broad patterns of economic development and also focuses specifically on the zaibatsu and Japanese management techniques; technology transfer; banking and financial systems; labour, education and human capital; the economic role of Japanese women; and the economic dimensions of imperialism and war.

Contents
51 articles, dating from 1964 to 1997 Contributors include: W.M. Fletcher, P. Francks, A. Gordon, T. Okazaki, K. Sugihara, M. Udagawa, K. Yamamura, S. Yonekura, T. Yui

Further information

‘It is consequently important to conclude by praising Tolliday for his achievement, given the undoubted quality of what has been included. Moreover, he has also edited a two-volume set covering the period 1945–95, allowing those who teach this subject to provide reading lists that ought to be much more focused.’
– John F. Wilson, The Economic History

‘The quality of Japanese record keeping and the energies of the authors brought together in this collection have made Japan the most richly documented of all examples of late industrialisation. Tolliday has done a discriminating dual-purpose job. He provides a splendid overall conspectus for someone coming new to the subject, and for those already seized by its fascination, easy access to a wide range of literature buried in the sort of journal you always find your library doesn’t take.’
– Ronald Dore, London School of Economics and Political Science, UK

This authoritative collection presents the key contributions on the economic history of Japan from the Meiji Restoration to the Second World War. It covers broad patterns of economic development and also focuses specifically on the zaibatsu and Japanese management techniques; technology transfer; banking and financial systems; labour, education and human capital; the economic role of Japanese women; and the economic dimensions of imperialism and war.

This two-volume set brings together important texts around these themes, including less well-known work first published in Japan. It will be a valuable reference work for scholars and students of history, economics, political science and Asian studies.

Full table of contents

Contents:
Volume I:
Acknowledgements
Introduction Steven Tolliday
PART I THE PATTERN OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
1. Kozo Yamamura (1973), ‘Towards a Reexamination of the Economic History of Tokugawa Japan, 1600–1867’
2. Susan B. Hanley (1983), ‘A High Standard of Living in Nineteenth-Century Japan: Fact or Fantasy?’
3. Yasukichi Yasuba (1986), ‘Standard of Living in Japan Before Industrialization: From What Level Did Japan Begin? A Comment’
4. Susan B. Hanley (1986), ‘Standard of Living in Nineteenth-Century Japan: Reply to Yasuba’
5. Thomas C. Smith (1973), ‘Pre-Modern Economic Growth: Japan and the West’
6. Kozo Yamamura (1974), ‘The Japanese Economy, 1911–1930: Concentration, Conflicts, and Crises’
7. Kaoru Sugihara (1989), ‘Japan’s Industrial Recovery, 1931–6’
8. Sugihara Kaoru (1990), ‘Japan as an Engine of the Asian International Economy, c. 1880–1936’
PART II LAND AND AGRICULTURE
9. Penelope Francks (1990), ‘Peasantry, Proletariat or Private Enterprise? – The Japanese Farmer in the Industrialisation Process’
10. Osamu Saito (1986), ‘The Rural Economy: Commercial Agriculture, By-Employment, and Wage Work’
11. Loren Brandt (1993), ‘Interwar Japanese Agriculture: Revisionist Views on the Impact of the Colonial Rice Policy and the Labor-Surplus Hypothesis’
12. Ann Waswo (1974), ‘The Origins of Tenant Unrest’
PART III MANAGEMENT AND ENTERPRISE SYSTEM
A General
13. Keiichiro Nakagawa (1993), ‘Business Management in Japan – A Comparative Historical Study’
14. Hisashi Masaki (1986), ‘The Formation and Evolution of the Corporate Business System in Japan’
15. Tsunehiko Yui (1988), ‘Development, Organization, and Business Strategy of Industrial Enterprises in Japan (1915–1935)’
B Zaibatsu
16. Kozo Yamamura (1967), ‘The Founding of Mitsubishi: A Case Study in Japanese Business History’
17. Seiichiro Yonekura (1985), ‘The Emergence of the Prototype of Enterprise Group Capitalism: The Case of Mitsui’
18. Hisashi Masaki (1978), ‘The Financial Characteristics of the Zaibatsu in Japan: The Old Zaibatsu and Their Closed Finance’
19. Kozo Yamamura (1976), ‘General Trading Companies in Japan: Their Origins and Growth’
C Non-Zaibatsu Business Development
20. Tessa Morris-Suzuki (1992), ‘Sericulture and the Origins of Japanese Industrialization’
21. Steven J. Ericson (1989), ‘Private Railways in the Meiji Era: Forerunners of Modern Japanese Management?’
22. Tetsuji Okazaki (1987), ‘The Japanese Iron and Steel Industry, 1929–33, and the Establishment of the Nippon Steel Co.’
23. W. Miles Fletcher III (1996), ‘The Japan Spinners Association: Creating Industrial Policy in Meiji Japan’
24. William Mass and Hideaki Miyajima (1993), ‘The Organization of the Developmental State: Fostering Private Capabilities and the Roots of the Japanese "Miracle"’
PART IV MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER
25. Tetsuro Nakaoka (1991), ‘The Transfer of Cotton Manufacturing Technology from Britain to Japan’
26. Kozo Yamamura (1986), ‘Japan’s Deus ex Machina: Western Technology in the 1920s’
27. Mark Mason (1990), ‘With Reservations: Prewar Japan as Host to Western Electric and ITT’
Name Index

Volume II:
Acknowledgements
Introduction Steven Tolliday
PART I BANKING AND FINANCE
1. Hugh T. Patrick (1967), ‘Japan, 1868–1914’
2. Kozo Yamamura (1972), ‘Japan 1868–1930: A Revised View’
3. Kanji Ishii (1991), ‘Japan’
4. W. Miles Fletcher III (1991), ‘Japanese Banks and National Economic Policy, 1920–1936’
PART II EDUCATION AND HUMAN CAPITAL
5. R.P. Dore (1964), ‘Education: Japan’
6. Koji Taira (1971), ‘Education and Literacy in Meiji Japan: An Interpretation’
7. James R. Bartholomew (1978), ‘Japanese Modernization and the Imperial Universities, 1876–1920’
PART III LABOUR
8. Akiko Chimoto (1986), ‘Employment in the Meiji Period: From "Tradition" to "Modernity"’
9. Thomas C. Smith (1984), ‘The Right to Benevolence: Dignity and Japanese Workers, 1890–1920’
10. E. Patricia Tsurumi (1984), ‘Female Textile Workers and the Failure of Early Trade Unionism in Japan’
11. Andrew Gordon (1989), ‘Business and the Corporate State: The Business Lobby and Bureaucrats on Labor, 1911–41’
12. Ron Napier (1982), ‘The Transformation of the Japanese Labor Market, 1894–1937’
13. Yasukichi Yasuba (1976), ‘The Evolution of Dualistic Wage Structure’
14. Andrew Gordon (1990), ‘Japanese Labor Relations During the Twentieth Century’
PART IV WOMEN
15. Sharon H. Nolte and Sally Ann Hastings (1991), ‘The Meiji State’s Policy Towards Women, 1890–1910’
16. Janet Hunter (1990), ‘Women’s Labour Force Participation in Interwar Japan’
17. Kathleen Uno (1993), ‘One Day at a Time: Work and Domestic Activities of Urban Lower-Class Women in Early Twentieth-Century Japan’
18. Robert J. Smith (1983), ‘Making Village Women into "Good Wives and Wise Mothers" in Prewar Japan’
PART V IMPERIALISM AND WAR
19. K. Yamamura (1977), ‘Success Illgotten? The Role of Meiji Militarism in Japan’s Technological Progress’
20. Kaoru Sugihara (1997), ‘The Economic Motivations Behind Japanese Aggression in the Late 1930s: Perspectives of Freda Utley and Nawa Toichi’
21. Peter Duus (1989), ‘Zaikabo: Japanese Cotton Mills in China, 1895–1937’
22. Masaru Udagawa (1990), ‘The Move into Manchuria of the Nissan Combine’
23. Richard Rice (1979), ‘Economic Mobilization in Wartime Japan: Business, Bureaucracy, and the Military in Conflict’
24. Takao Shiba (1994), ‘Business Activities of Japanese Manufacturing Industries During World War II’
Name Index



 
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