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Beyond The Iraq War

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Beyond The Iraq War

The Promises, Pitfalls and Perils of External Interventionism

Michael Heazle , Iyanatul Islam

Edited by Michael Heazle, Research Fellow, Griffith Asia Institute, Griffith Business School, Griffith University, Australia and Iyanatul Islam, Professor of International Business, Griffith Business School and Griffith Asia Institute, Griffith University, Australia and Co-Editor, Journal of the Asia Pacific Economy

2006 208 pp Hardback 978 1 84542 632 3
ebook isbn 978 1 78195 897 1

Hardback £77.00 on-line price £69.30

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Description
This book critically analyses the topic of US-led external interventions in the affairs of developing countries by using one of the most contested experiments of modern times, namely, the invasion of Iraq and its aftermath. The March 2003 invasion of Iraq has so far failed to deliver the benefits and outcomes its supporters anticipated, prompting international discussion as to whether the promises of externally-led nation-building (as an attempt to mould rogue states in a democratic, market-friendly fashion) are outweighed by the kinds of pitfalls and perils of intervention that have come to characterise the Iraq experience. This book identifies and addresses the major issues emerging from the current debate including the evolution of external interventionism as an idea, an explanation of what went wrong in post-Saddam Iraq and why the Iraq experiment is flawed by the Bush administration’s refusal to address long standing political and historical grievances among Muslims as part of the ‘War on Terror’. The contributors assess the troubled relationship between Islam and the West, the prospects for democracy in the Middle East, foreign policy debates in the US, and how economics and politics are juxtaposed in a highly contentious manner in any project of externally-driven nation-building.

Contents
Contents: Foreword by Kevin Rudd, MP Part I: Political Origins and Future of Neoliberal Interventionism Part II: Neoliberal Interventionism in Practice: Democracy and the Iraq Experiment Part III: Through the Looking Glass: Western–Arab/Muslim Relations and Perceptions Part IV: The Economics of Neoliberal Intervention: All Dollars and No Sense? Index Contributors: A. Bubalo, R.P. Buckley, I. Chernus, J. Hartley, M. Heazle, I. Islam, P. Khalil, K. Rudd, A. Saikal, M. Wesley

Further information

‘The main lesson from the Iraq experience so far has been the enormous costs of military intervention. The effects of a doctrine of interventionism on both the target country and the international political environment in general are profound and far-reaching. As a test case, Iraq has demonstrated a clear need for both the costs and benefits and the circumstances under which intervention should occur to be much better defined and understood. Careful evaluation of the thinking and goals behind the Iraq intervention, the difficulties it faces, and its status as a “test case” for dealing with conventional and non-conventional threats alike is required. This volume on the promises and perils of interventionism, therefore, is both timely and significant.’
– From the foreword by Kevin Rudd, MP, Australian Shadow Minister for Foreign Affairs and International Security

This book critically analyses the topic of US-led external interventions in the affairs of developing countries by using one of the most contested experiments of modern times, namely, the invasion of Iraq and its aftermath. The March 2003 invasion of Iraq has so far failed to deliver the benefits and outcomes its supporters anticipated, prompting international discussion as to whether the promises of externally-led nation-building (as an attempt to mould rogue states in a democratic, market-friendly fashion) are outweighed by the kinds of pitfalls and perils of intervention that have come to characterise the Iraq experience. This book identifies and addresses the major issues emerging from the current debate including the evolution of external interventionism as an idea, an explanation of what went wrong in post-Saddam Iraq and why the Iraq experiment is flawed by the Bush administration’s refusal to address long standing political and historical grievances among Muslims as part of the ‘War on Terror’. The contributors assess the troubled relationship between Islam and the West, the prospects for democracy in the Middle East, foreign policy debates in the US, and how economics and politics are juxtaposed in a highly contentious manner in any project of externally-driven nation-building.

Beyond the Iraq War brings together scholars and practitioners in an attempt to move beyond the polemical dimensions of the existing debate and provide a balanced analysis of what the Iraq enterprise can tell us about the brand of external interventionism espoused by the Bush administration and also the lessons it holds for any future interventions into the affairs of states. It combines a mix of disciplines, most notably international relations and economics as well as theory and empirical evidence. The book is written in a non-technical, but rigorous, manner in order to make complex and diverse issues accessible to the general reader.

This fascinating and scholarly work will appeal to academics and scholars in the fields of political economics, political science and international relations. Policymakers, journalists and media commentators will also find this work to be of great interest and value.

Full table of contents

Contents:

Foreword
Kevin Rudd, MP

1. Editors’ Introduction: New Interventionism but Same Old Promises and Perils?
Michael Heazle and Iyanatul Islam

PART I: POLITICAL ORIGINS AND FUTURE OF NEOLIBERAL INTERVENTIONISM
2. The New Interventionism and the Invasion of Iraq
Michael Wesley

3. Competing US Perspectives on Iraq
Ira Chernus

PART II: NEOLIBERAL INTERVENTIONISM IN PRACTICE: DEMOCRACY AND THE IRAQ EXPERIMENT
4. Democratisation Dilemmas: Iraq, the United States and Political Reform in the Middle East
Anthony Bubalo

5. Cooperation and Resistance under Occupation: A Complex Web
Peter Khalil

6. Post Election Iraq: A Case for Declining Optimism
John Hartley

PART III: THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS: WESTERN–ARAB/MUSLIM RELATIONS AND PERCEPTIONS
7. Islam and the West: Where to from Here?
Amin Saikal

8. Covering (Up) Islam Part III: Terrorism and the US Intervention in Iraq
Michael Heazle

PART IV: THE ECONOMICS OF NEOLIBERAL INTERVENTION: ALL DOLLARS AND NO SENSE?
9. Iraq’s Sovereign Debt and its Curious Global Implications
Ross P. Buckley

10. Neoliberalism and Post-Saddam Iraq: A Global Perspective
Iyanatul Islam

Index



 
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