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Global Warming And The Asian Pacific

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Global Warming And The Asian Pacific

Ching-Cheng Chang , Robert Mendelsohn , Daigee Shaw

Edited by Ching-Cheng Chang, Research Fellow, Institute of Economics, Academia Sinica and Professor, Department of Agricultural Economics, National Taiwan University, Taiwan, Robert Mendelsohn, Edwin Weyerhaeuser Davis Professor of Forestry Policy, School of Forestry and Environmental Sciences and Professor of Economics, Department of Economics and School of Management, Yale University, New Haven, US and Daigee Shaw, Academia Sinica, Taiwan

2003 328 pp Hardback 978 1 84376 419 9
ebook isbn 978 1 78195 758 5

Hardback £100.00 on-line price £90.00

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Series: Academia Studies in Asian Economies series



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Description
‘This well structured volume covers an important topic in a timely and comprehensive manner. The editors have brought together a knowledgeable and distinguished team of writers, who clearly articulate the Asia Pacific viewpoint on climate change. They should be congratulated on producing a nicely written book which will be of great interest to students, researchers and policymakers.’
– Mohan Munasinghe, Munasinghe Institute for Development (MIND), Colombo, Sri Lanka and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Geneva, Switzerland

This unique book examines the problem of global warming from the perspective of Asian Pacific countries. The unprecedented economic and demographic growth over the past two decades has increased the importance of the Asian Pacific region. It has become both a very large source of greenhouse gases as well as an important site to measure climate change impacts.

Complex economic tools including computable general equilibrium models, international input–output models and engineering–economic models are used to assess the baseline emission levels and abatement costs for the economies examined. All outcomes suggest that abatement is possible, but will be expensive. The studies also suggest that the more energy efficient the economy, the higher the costs of further abatement. The book reveals how Asian countries in the tropics are more likely to be harmed than those in the temperate zone.

Contents
Contents: Foreword Part I: Baseline Emissions Part II: Abatement Costs Part III: Warming Impacts Part IV: Policy Instruments Index Contributors: C.-C. Chang, C.-C. Chen, C. Fischer, F. Ghersi, S.-H. Hsu, C.-H. Huang, K. Ishida, D.W. Jorgenson, R. Kopp, J. Krozer, M. Kuroda, R. de Leeuw, P.-C. Li, C.-Y. Liang, H.-H. Lin, G. Ma, B.A. McCarl, W.J. McKibbin, R. Mendelsohn, R. Morgenstern, K. Nomura, W. Pizer, V.X. Quang, H. Sakuramoto, U.A. Schneider, D. Shaw, M. Shimizu, N. Takenaka, E.C. van Ierland, A. Washizu, Y. Zheng

Further information

‘This well structured volume covers an important topic in a timely and comprehensive manner. The editors have brought together a knowledgeable and distinguished team of writers, who clearly articulate the Asia Pacific viewpoint on climate change. They should be congratulated on producing a nicely written book which will be of great interest to students, researchers and policymakers.’
– Mohan Munasinghe, Munasinghe Institute for Development (MIND), Colombo, Sri Lanka and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Geneva, Switzerland

This unique book examines the problem of global warming from the perspective of Asian Pacific countries. The unprecedented economic and demographic growth over the past two decades has increased the importance of the Asian Pacific region. It has become both a very large source of greenhouse gases as well as an important site to measure climate change impacts.

Complex economic tools including computable general equilibrium models, international input–output models and engineering–economic models are used to assess the baseline emission levels and abatement costs for the economies examined. All outcomes suggest that abatement is possible, but will be expensive. The studies also suggest that the more energy efficient the economy, the higher the costs of further abatement. The book reveals how Asian countries in the tropics are more likely to be harmed than those in the temperate zone.

Alternative strategies to mitigate carbon emissions such as energy conservation, emission permit trading, carbon tax, and carbon sequestration are examined to tackle the difficult problem of establishing effective policy tools to control warming in the Asian Pacific and the globe. While no single author provides a complete answer to this complex problem, all authors provide vital information and new ideas with which to fashion workable international and regional policies.

Global Warming and the Asian Pacific is likely to be read by scholars and researchers of Asian studies, environmental and resource economics, as well as policymakers and those specifically involved in global warming research and policy.

Full table of contents

Contents: Foreword 1. Global Warming and the Asian Pacific Part I: Baseline Emissions 2. Forecasting Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Vietnam 3. Baseline Forecasting for Greenhouse Gas Reductions in Taiwan: A Dynamic CGE Analysis 4. Forecasting Baseline CO2 Emissions in Japan 5. Analysis of Economic and Environmental Interdependency in East Asian Countries Part II: Abatement Costs 6. Effect of Energy Tax on CO2 Emissions and Economic Development in Taiwan, 1999–2020 7. Impact of Carbon Tax and Reduced CO2 Emissions on Chinese Economy: A Static CGE Analysis 8. Cost of Reducing CO2 Emissions in Japan 9. Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Through Energy Crops in the US with Implications for Asian Pacific Countries Part III: Warming Impacts 10. Climate Change and Crop Yield Distribution in Taiwan 11. Will Global Warming Cause Heat Stress? 12. The Impact of Climate Change on Asian Pacific Countries Part IV: Policy Instruments 13. Reducing Cost Uncertainty and Encouraging Ratification of the Kyoto Protocol 14. A Better Alternative to the Kyoto Protocol 15. Joint Implementation, the Clean Development Mechanism and the Baseline: An Economic Analysis 16. Economic Issues Related to Design of a Domestic Permit Trading System Index



 
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